Elfstedentocht in Mongolia, pool party, photomarathon, cricket

Knock out
You're the one that I want, whoohoohoo
Rianca and Emiel
Nice sixpack, man
Daniel
In the pool
Emiel showing off his bod
Linda, fully clothed but in the pool
Linda and the boys
Jered
Christo
Pool party
Jackie, some new guy, Deedee and Betsy
Jo'burg mosque
Accurate karmic destiny reading by Atul (S.A. born)
At Fourways Mall, it's Adventure Golf
Christian is -very- cool
Just hangin'
HDR of trees in Fourways
Drunken cat from the DROS logo
Helping them cross the river
Crossing the river
White grave
Christian
BT, Moses, Mammaries
Down the hill
Danger gevaar ingozi
Playing the game
Reflect
Shot?
Trespassers will be shot
Suikerbekkie
Forsdicks
Madiba
Streets in western Pretoria
Change
Pakistan makes another four!
Bowling
Girls acting weird
Wicket!
During the break, the crowd went wild
The chicks fold over
Girls gone wild
And now on one leg...
Spoek playing with a dead pigeon
Spoek about to run away with the dead pigeon
Rianca, shooting
A waltz
Splash
Babak and Betsy
Linda shooting up
Peter
Christian
Stoned?
Iz
Johannesburg mosque
How much is that doggy in the window?
What's with the tongue?
Near-naked chick at cricket
Jumping cricket cheerleaders
Hands up!

The Dutch newspaper 'Volkskrant' has an article on the next 'alternative Elfstedentocht', which will be held in March on Khovskol lake, in Mongolia. Wish I was there.
Interesting will be how they'll get the riders and supporters out there: the lake, beautiful as it is, is in the middle of nowhere.

Meanwhile, here in Jo'burg, where everyday the temperature rises to the 30 degrees centigrade mark, I've started organising the first African photomarathon, which will be held on February 24th, right here in Jo'burg. The main sponsor of the event is The Bag Factory.

Last weekend, we spend some time at Christo's pool party where too much whiskey, beer and great steak knocked me out.

And some two weeks ago, Betsy, Jasper and myself went over to Centurion to check out a test match between South Africa and Pakistan (I'm talking cricket here). Test matches tend to last four or five days and we only saw half of one.
During the lunch break, the crowd was allowed on the field, but not on the pitch (is it called a pitch?), and they went wild. Everyone had brought cricket bats, balls, soccer balls and whatnot.

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