25 Mar 2001 | Mole

Larabonga mosque

The second of the organized trips brought us to Mole, Ghana's biggest national park, still filled with elephants, monkeys, deer, lions and more. Although this sounds quite interesting, the whole trip needed to visit the place makes the visit a bit less then worthwile. Although combined with the nearby town of Larabonga, with its amazing mosque, it can be enough to justify the difficult journey.

There

The park is located in the north of Ghana and, traveling from Accra, it takes some twelve to fourteen hours to get there. On the less then reasonable roads of Ghana, a trip like that is as close to torture you can get, before it becoming illegal in most western European countries. When traveling back to Accra, we were so lucky as to travel for a total of 19 hours. That is bad.

And back

And not just the roads are in bad condition. So are the cars. For one, about 95% of all motorized vehicles have embarked on a second life in West Africa, after being left for dead by their former European owners, back in Holland, Germany, France or Denmark, proof being the country stickers on the back bumpers of most cars. One characteristic being the almost always cracked windscreens of cars. Then, they always manage to stuff about twice the legally allowed amount of people into any vehicle. Of course, most probably, this helps wen getting into an accident. The lack of airbags is made up by the existence of people-bags.

Traveling back from Mole we had quite a hard time. As with the previous group of Geeks, with whom Stophe had also gone to Mole, we all had round trip tickets for a state bus traveling between Accra and Tamale, Ghana's third city, some miles above Mole. However last time, when the Geeks wanted to get on the bus coming from Tamale when it past Mole, it turned out that their seats had been sold to other contenders back in Tamale. This meant that Stophe had decided that we would travel to Tamale first, and get on the bus there, to minimize the chances of our tickets being sold. We had to leave at 3am to get to Tamale in time for catching our bus. When in Tamale, it turned out that our seats still had been sold to other people. Using several different services between Tamale and Accra, we eventually arrived home some 19hours after leaving Mole. Mole is nice, but it is not THAT nice.

The leg of the trip from Kumasi to Accra was enlivened by two preachers IN the bus, trying to preach two different gospels, at the same time. None of the passengers seemed to notice. For us, all sitting at the back of a long bus, it was very, very annoying to listen to their constant shouting. This annoyance, probably being increased by the fact that in Mole, since there is not that much to do over there, some of us had embarked on a whiskey-beer-vodka binge the previous evening.

Tagged with: Africa Ghana Larabonga Mole mosque night life

Larabonga mosque
Market
Boys will be boys
Open wide
Kids at Larabonga mosque
Baba is a root boy
Elephants at Mole
But where is it?
Giving me the finger
Larabonga mosque
Bathing elephants
Jasons making friends
Spooky
Fighting to get in front
Youre offering me what?
Two chicks
Used not used
Larabonga mosque
Larabonga mosque
Kids having breakfast
Preparing the mornings food
Which way?
Guide
Mystic!
Tims making friends
What?
NO MORE PHOTOS
Larabonga mosque

About

  • Me

After obtaining an M. Sc in maths, Babak Fakhamzadeh started with an office job at a major blue chip company but soon realised he'd do better on his own. Babak is a traveling web guru with a penchant for doing good and a love for visual and experimental art. Together with Eduardo Cachucho, he won the World Summit Award in the m-Tourism and Culture category in 2012 for Dérive app. With Ismail Farouk, he won the Highway Africa new media award in 2007 for Soweto Uprisings . com. Check out Babak's CV.

Contact

Babak is currently in Brasil.
+55 219 6557 5388 (Brasil)

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